In order to provide equal access and equal opportunity to people with diverse abilities, this site has been designed with accessibility in mind. Click here to view

Audio

Showing: All

On Wednesday, the Senate approved two education bills to help enhance retention and graduation rates at Oklahoma’s public colleges and universities. Sen. Dewayne Pemberton is the author of Senate Bills 237 and 238 dealing with state and federal financial aid for students.

read more.

Oklahoma has been praised as having one of the best and most secure election systems in the country. On Wednesday, the Senate overwhelmingly supported legislation prohibiting any state official, agency or local government from altering election procedures through legal agreements or court settlements that conflict with state election law.

Sen. Lonnie Paxton, R-Tuttle, said he authored Senate Bill 523 to protect the integrity of Oklahoma elections by preventing the questionable and unethical election actions that took place in other states during the 2020 presidential election.

read more.

The full Senate has given approval to a bill to help law enforcement locate kidnap victims faster.  Sen. Darrell Weaver, R-Moore, is the author of Senate Bill 272, the “Kelsey Smith Act,” which would require cell phone companies to provide phone location information to law enforcement in emergency situations, such as an abduction.  

read more.

A bill that will help more nonviolent offenders qualify for the Electronic Monitoring Program passed out of the Senate unanimously late Tuesday. Senate Bill 456’s author, Sen. Bill Coleman, said the measure was needed to correct an oversight in state law that left inmates sentenced between five and ten years unable to participate in home monitoring.

read more.

Among the many bills stopped during the shortened 2020 legislative session was one to help potentially save lives by providing judicial authorization of certain anatomical gifts. Altus Republican Brent Howard reintroduced his legislation this session, which received approval Tuesday by the Senate.

read more.
Full Senate approves Ida’s Law

Legislation to address the issue of unsolved cases of missing and murdered Native American people has been approved unanimously by the full Senate. Sen. Paul Rosino, R-Oklahoma City, is the principal author of Senate Bill 172, known as Ida’s Law. The measure is named for 29-year-old Ida Beard from El Reno. A citizen of the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes, she went missing in 2015 and has never been found.

Rosino said there are currently more than 220 missing American Indians in Oklahoma, with about 14 of those from his own Senate District.

read more.

The Senate approved legislation Tuesday expanding educational opportunities for Oklahoma families. Senate Bill 783, by Sen. Adam Pugh, R-Edmond, modifies the Education Open Transfer Act to allow students to transfer to another public school district year-round. Pugh, who serves as the Chair of the Senate Education Committee, said the bill is desperately needed to provide families more flexibility to find the school that meets the needs of their child.

read more.

A Senate bill aimed at ensuring teachers receive due process is now on it’s way to the House of Representatives for further consideration.  Senate Bill 13, by Sen. Brenda Stanley, R-Midwest City, was approved unanimously by the full Senate on Monday. Stanley said the bill addresses a loophole in current statutes that can result in a teacher being fired without due process.

read more.

OKLAHOMA CITY – The Senate has approved Senate Bill 8, which would designate the route that largely follows State Highway 69 in Oklahoma as the “Historic Jefferson Highway Route.” The measure is authored by Sen. Micheal Bergstrom, R-Adair.  

Established in 1915, the Jefferson Highway is the oldest highway to pass through Oklahoma and spans the state from the Kansas to Texas borders. This highway cuts through the heart of the Louisiana Purchase Territory and is named after President Thomas Jefferson for his role in the transaction.

read more.

OKLAHOMA CITY – The Senate approved legislation Monday by Sen. Carri Hicks to modify teaching exam requirements and better support nursing mothers in Oklahoma schools.

read more.