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Showing: February, 2005

The Oklahoma State Senate has announced another technological innovation to open up the legislative process to the public. Beginning Monday, February 28, anyone with Internet access will be able to see and hear the proceedings live from the Senate Chamber, via webcast.

“Last year we began offering live streaming audio. Now anyone who is interested will be able to see live video from the chamber as well,” Hobson said. “I think this is going to be exciting for students, educators and any one in the public who would like to learn more about their government.”
read more.

Senate Communications Director Malia Bennett discusses new webcast service.
Senate Executive Assistant Cindy Sullivan says it will help her and her Senator's constituents.
Senate Communications Specialist Adrianne Covington recorded live via webcast.

A bill to require an alphanumeric sequence rather than computer-generated numbers for Oklahoma driver licenses or identification cards has won Senate approval. Sen. Clark Jolley is principal author of the measure.

“If you look at an Oklahoma driver’s license and a Social Security number, you can’t distinguish the two. Since numerous businesses now require your driver license number for financial transactions, I believe it is imperative that we are able to simply glance at the number and be able to distinguish it from a Social Security number,” explained Jolley, R-Edmond read more.

Sen. Jolley says SB 24 would prevent inadvertent identity theft.

The Oklahoma State Senate has announced another technological innovation to open up the legislative process to the public. Beginning Monday, February 28, anyone with Internet access will be able to see and hear the proceedings live from the Senate Chamber, via webcast.

“Last year we began offering live streaming audio. Now anyone who is interested will be able to see live video from the chamber as well,” Hobson said. “I think this is going to be exciting for students, educators and any one in the public who would like to learn more about their government.”
read more.

Senate Communications Director Malia Bennett discusses new webcast service.
Senate Executive Assistant Cindy Sullivan says it will help her and her Senator's constituents.
Senate Communications Specialist Adrianne Covington recorded live via webcast.

The Oklahoma State Senate has announced another technological innovation to open up the legislative process to the public. Beginning Monday, February 28, anyone with Internet access will be able to see and hear the proceedings live from the Senate Chamber, via webcast.

“Last year we began offering live streaming audio. Now anyone who is interested will be able to see live video from the chamber as well,” Hobson said. “I think this is going to be exciting for students, educators and any one in the public who would like to learn more about their government.”
read more.

Senate Communications Director Malia Bennett discusses new webcast service.
Senate Executive Assistant Cindy Sullivan says it will help her and her Senator's constituents.
Senate Communications Specialist Adrianne Covington recorded live via webcast.

Lack of Senate Action Does Not Bode Well for House Bills

Senate Republican leaders said Thursday that Senate Democrats seem intent on keeping the Senate’s reputation as the Legislature’s “graveyard for good legislation” by refusing to schedule committee hearings for dozens of good public policy legislation authored by Republicans. A Senate bill that did not receive a committee hearing by Thursday is dead for the session.

read more.
Sen. Coffee says the State Senate is a graveyard for good legislation.
Sen. Reynolds points out that only 1 out of 30 finance bills passed was a Republican measure.
Sen. Brogdon notes that public support for the TABOR bill was greater than for the Marriage Protection Act.

Lack of Senate Action Does Not Bode Well for House Bills

Senate Republican leaders said Thursday that Senate Democrats seem intent on keeping the Senate’s reputation as the Legislature’s “graveyard for good legislation” by refusing to schedule committee hearings for dozens of good public policy legislation authored by Republicans. A Senate bill that did not receive a committee hearing by Thursday is dead for the session.

read more.
Sen. Coffee says the State Senate is a graveyard for good legislation.
Sen. Reynolds points out that only 1 out of 30 finance bills passed was a Republican measure.
Sen. Brogdon notes that public support for the TABOR bill was greater than for the Marriage Protection Act.

Lack of Senate Action Does Not Bode Well for House Bills

Senate Republican leaders said Thursday that Senate Democrats seem intent on keeping the Senate’s reputation as the Legislature’s “graveyard for good legislation” by refusing to schedule committee hearings for dozens of good public policy legislation authored by Republicans. A Senate bill that did not receive a committee hearing by Thursday is dead for the session.

read more.
Sen. Coffee says the State Senate is a graveyard for good legislation.
Sen. Reynolds points out that only 1 out of 30 finance bills passed was a Republican measure.
Sen. Brogdon notes that public support for the TABOR bill was greater than for the Marriage Protection Act.

As the Senate Finance Committee completed its work on Senate bills assigned to it, the panel’s chair said the panel’s work is responsible and shows a deep respect for Oklahoma working families.

Senator Jay Paul Gumm said the committee considered and approved upwards of $300 million in tax cuts, almost all of which are targeted to working families or to grow Oklahoma’s economy.
read more.

Sen. Gumm says that the Legislature must take a responsible approach to funding state government.

State Senator Debbe Leftwich, D-OKC, and House Speaker Pro Tempore Susan Winchester, R-Chickasha, are calling the first meeting of the Oklahoma Women’s Caucus a tremendous success. Women lawmakers from the House and Senate gathered at the State Capitol for a session which included a presentation on similar organizations throughout the nation as well as a demonstration on women’s health issues.
read more.

Sen. Wilcoxson says it's very exciting that women from both houses can work together across party lines on important women's issues.
Rep. Ann Coody says the Women's Caucus is a great opportunity for women who have so much in common to work together.

State Senator Debbe Leftwich, D-OKC, and House Speaker Pro Tempore Susan Winchester, R-Chickasha, are calling the first meeting of the Oklahoma Women’s Caucus a tremendous success. Women lawmakers from the House and Senate gathered at the State Capitol for a session which included a presentation on similar organizations throughout the nation as well as a demonstration on women’s health issues.
read more.

Sen. Wilcoxson says it's very exciting that women from both houses can work together across party lines on important women's issues.
Rep. Ann Coody says the Women's Caucus is a great opportunity for women who have so much in common to work together.