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Oklahoma Senate advances civil service reforms

The Oklahoma Senate advanced legislation Wednesday aimed at updating the state’s civil service code, which has not seen significant updates since 1982.

Senate President Pro Tempore Greg Treat, R-Oklahoma City, is the author of both Senate Bill 1780, which places a sunset date of July 1, 2021, on the Merit Protection Commission, and of Senate Bill 1879, which seeks to modernize the human resources policies that guide the management of the state’s workforce.

“The civil service system hasn’t been significantly updated since 1982. Many of the policies that guide the management of the state’s workforce are outdated and ineffective because so much has changed about the way we work since the 1980s,” Treat said. “This is an effort to usher in much-needed reforms that will eliminate outdated red-tape and make human resources management easier and more effective within state agencies, adding more accountability and transparency while preserving protections like due process for state employees.”

Senate Bill 1879 passed the Senate with the title of the bill stricken, which is a procedural move that means the bill must return to the Senate for final passage. Treat said work on the overall reform effort will continue and his ultimate goal was to work with Rep. Mike Osburn, House author of SB 1879 and of companion legislation in the House, in conference committee to finalize the reform package that ultimately would be considered by the Legislature.

State agencies use the merit system as their human resources management structure. About two-thirds of the state’s more than 30,000 employees are classified within the merit system.

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For more information, contact:
Sen. Treat: (405) 521-5565 or Greg.Treat@oksenate.gov

 

 

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